Thursday, January 19, 2012

New exciting opportunity for clean energy jobs in Michigan

From the Michigan League of Conservation Voters*
Posted Jan. 12, 2012

Michigan has the chance to seize a remarkable opportunity in 2012 that will create thousands of new jobs and dramatically improve public health across the state. A proposed ballot initiative that would increase the state's renewable energy standard to 25 percent by 2025 is being put forth for the 2012 November elections. What does that mean? A quick breakdown:
  • If the proposal gathers enough signatures, it will then be considered for placement on the November ballot. It will require that 25 percent of Michigan’s energy come from clean, renewable sources such as wind, solar and biomass by 2025.

  • Right now, Michigan imports the vast majority of its energy from other states and countries, sending billions of dollars out of Michigan each year. Instead of producing our own energy -- and creating our own jobs -- we are importing dirty coal from other states and oil from the Middle East. This proposal will help us build a clean energy industry right here in Michigan.

  • This initiative will help expand Michigan’s clean energy production, without significantly increasing energy prices. In fact, studies by independent economists predict that it would cost the average Michigander, at most, $15 per year, or only $1.25 per month.

  • Unfortunately, we're lagging behind other states who have already realized the importance and value of more renewable energy. Twenty other states, including Illinois, Minnesota and Iowa, have already adopted measures similar to this initiative without significant increases in utility costs for consumers.

  • Beyond creating Michigan jobs and expanding Michigan's economy, using more wind and solar energy will reduce pollution and give Michigan families cleaner and healthier air and water, protect the Great Lakes from more mercury pollution, and reduce asthma and lung disease.
* Editor's Note: This article is reprinted with permission from the Michigan League of Conservation Voters. Check out their Web site at www.michiganlcv.org.
You can follow them on Twitter at @michiganlcv or on Facebook for quick updates.

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